16 July, 2016

Evolves to . . .

I'm utterly late getting this post out, and I apologize for that.

I mentioned last time that I'd be doing Camp NaNoWriMo again, so I have, in a way; this time, I'm using the first half of the month for some art projects related to my writing. I can't debut that particular art just yet, but I did have to stop and make a character sheet for Pierce, call-sign "Kentucky", one of my main characters in Tragedy of Ice.

Pierce's character sheet, July 2016

Just like being an author, my skills as an artist have significantly improved over the last year. Comparing my lines and colours to the character sheets I did last year, I've come a long way. It may not seem that noticeable to others, but as the artist, I can always tell when my style has evolved.

Kadiza's character sheet, June 2015

I can see it with my old writing, too. Looking at the short stories I've already published, I can see just how much my style has changed and evolved since I began publishing in 2014. Even for things as recent as last year, holding "Evening Hallow" up next to "Comeuppance", let alone to Tragedy of Ice, I can see the nuanced differences in sentence structure, beats, etc. Even the way I describe characters' appearances and mannerisms.


The evolution of an author/artist is one to behold, for sure. And maybe that's what's happening with Comedy of Rain: I'm evolving styles again.

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Ash Litton

Ash Litton is a writer and lover of sci-fi, fantasy, and all things fictional. She is the author of No Signal, Thoroughbred, Evening Hallow, Comeuppance, and Cabover Cabaret, and works on other Appalachian Dream Tales between her ongoing novel projects.

When she's not writing, she's drawing, and when she's not doing either of those, she's dreaming up new projects to work on. Born and raised in rural West Virginia, Ash has always wondered what things lay hidden in the hills around her. She attended West Virginia University, where she studied the English language before returning home to her family in rural West Virginia.